Prairie Collection - Ad Astra Statement Necklace

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Prairie Collection - Ad Astra Statement Necklace

2,320.00

By far the most involved MeritMade piece I’ve ever made, this necklace is a true statement. However, don’t be afraid of it. It is still very wearable. Weighing in at about 7.5 oz., It has a very solid feel to it, but it is not too heavy by any means. It can easily transition from a t-shirt and jeans, to a beautiful evening dress. I must admit, I totally test drove it to a casual dinner with jeans, t-shirt, and leather jacket. I felt like a total bada$$.

Total length of the necklace is approx. 20”. Each piece is a hollow constructed bead/box. The clasp was specifically created to integrate seamless into the design. The 5 main focal beads in the front have a variety of prairie plamts that can be viewed through the little glass windows.

Plants from left to right: white sage, dotted gayfeather, sunflower, goldenrod, snow on the mountain

•White Sage: Aka wormwood, mugwort, sage wort etc. has been long held sacred by Native Americans. Used as tea, burned, or even brushed across a surface, it has the power to both purify and protect.

•Goldenrod: Native Americans chewed the roots to relieve toothaches. Ground up leaves or boiled leaf extract can be used as an antiseptic lotion. Most importantly, it blooms late in the season and is a valuable source of pollen for bees during that time. Just so you know, goldenrod does not cause allergies. It blooms at the same time as ragweed, who is the actual culprit.

•Dotted Gayfeather: The roots of the dotted gayfeather may be cooked and eaten. Native Americans have used a tea made from the root to help with swelling and intestinal pain. It is thought to help stimulate the liver and kidneys. It is worth noting that its amazing root system can grow up to 16 feet deep! Native originally to the prairie, it is now grown worldwide in greenhouses for its ornamental value.

•Common Sunflower: First cultivated by Native Americans, this plant does it all. Sunflower oil is extracted and used for cooking, paints, soaps, and hair oil. The seeds can be eaten and ground as a flour. Purple and black dye can be made from the seeds and yellow dyes from the flowers. Due to it being one of the lightest natural substances, having a specific gravity of 0.028 compared to 0.028 of cork, even the pith of the plant has been used as life preserver filler.
•Snow on the Mountain: It is a relative of the poinsettia. A stand of it can make the ground appear as if it is covered in snow. Despite its beauty, it is poisonous to cattle.

Learn more about the process and history of this piece HERE

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